SpruceRoots Booklets - March 2007

OLD GROWTH FOREST DISTRIBUTION and CONDITION
The Forests of Haida Gwaii/QCI in the years 1800 & 2000
On Haida Gwaii in 2004, the people gathered together in the Community Planning Forum for the Land Use Plan created a list of questions about the Islands’ ecology and forest economy. There were two basic questions in particular that everyone thought were essential to creating a good plan, and so wanted answers for:

Q1 What are the different kinds of forest and how are they distributed in different places on the Islands?

Q2 How much of the better quality (higher value) old growth forest has been logged and how much remains?

Both questions were taken up by a team of technical experts, who used a computer GIS system to model and map the best information available. This booklet illustrates the results of that inquiry.
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14.5 x 21"
This is a large format folio to maintain the detail in the maps.
FOREST ECONOMY TRENDS and ECONOMIC CONDITIONS
on HAIDA GWAII

Over the past decade, the Gowgaia Institute has developed a comprehensive database of the volumes and values of logs shipped from Haida Gwaii for the period 1979–2004. Drawn from provincial government billing records and information from the Vancouver Log Market, the database contains over 250,000 entries containing values for the following data categories:

  • timber mark license owner
  • license type
  • year logged
  • species logged
  • log grades
  • volume logged
  • stumpage paid
  • waste assessed
  • estimated raw log value inflation adjustment to 2004 (Canadian CPIData for previous years are not readily available, but we are searching for it.
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5x8.5"
We have also created a spatial deconstruction of the logging history for the period 1900–2004, based on forest cover data, satellite imagery and archival air photos. This is a 1:20,000 scale GIS project, mapped at 1:50,000 scale for analysis and animation of annual logging. While it’s no substitute for actual data, the model does support the correlation of the known spatial distribution of logging to the known average volumes and values in order to generate reasonable and defensible estimates for the entire history of logging on the islands.

This booklet presents selected summaries of the database to illustrate the analysis