SpruceRoots - Stories
NEW STORIES
THE MOTHER OF FROGS
My name is Walker Brown, my Haida name is Geda Ku Juus.The ideas presented in this article are brief and random, covering many different subjects. I will touch on concepts and ideas in relation to Haida art form and crest origins.
By Walker Brown

AND THE STORY GOES...
A hundred and fifty days ago in Haida Gwaii, these islands at the edge of the world, it was February the 25th 2005. Outside the Port Clements community hall it was a grey winter Friday, but inside things looked pretty black and white to everyone involved in the land use plan.
By John Broadhead

IT JUST MAKES YOU WANNA BREAK A PLATE!
I have to tell you that my dishwasher has been acting up for three months. Oh, sure, it still washes the dishes, but it shrieks in mechanical protest as it’s going through all its cycles, which takes a full excruciating 70 minutes for each load. And so, in order to preserve my eardrums and sanity, I was on the verge of going back to scrubbing dishes by hand when I accidentally discovered that the screeching stopped if firm pressure was applied to a long skinny panel located near the bottom of dishwasher. I discovered this the day I hauled off and kicked it. So, now, whenever the noise become overwhelming, I stand in the kitchen with my foot jammed up against the skinny panel.
By Amanda Reid-Stevens

FLAP, FLAP, GLIDE
Gerry Morigeau and I were driving down the muddy mainline one spring morning four years ago, drinking coffee and listening to Bruce Springsteen’s The River. We were on our way to Drill Creek to walk. We were looking for goshawk sign. High up above a spur road Gerry introduced me to ‘The King’, the largest hemlock I have ever seen. I remember how immediately upon that meeting, my assumptions about time and scale slipped away, down the slope, towards that rock-lined road. The miles of logged land harboured more than hope. It became one of my favorite places in the world.
By Erica Thompson

+ and -
Well, this is the end, so I had better start at the beginning. The first time I remember reading SpruceRoots was when Simon interviewed Dale Lore—around the time the Islands Community Stability Initiative was really gathering steam. Nearly ten years ago now. I was a rookie reporter working for the Observer and just getting a sense of the social and political scene on Haida Gwaii. It was a great read. Dale went on a few good rants which bordered on the messianic and raised questions in my young mind about...
By Ian Lordon

NEGOTIATING COEXISTENCE
Like most of British Columbia, Haida Gwaii has yet to reconcile the future of the land with
its original inhabitants-the Haida people. With a few notable exceptions, most recently the
Nisga'a, the majority of First Nations people in BC never relinquished their assertion of
title over the land through treaty, conquest, or other means. In spite of this, over the centuries the vast confederation of provinces and territories which we callCanada sprung up around them, bringing foreign laws, industry, and settlers along with it.

THE HAIDA PROTECTED AREAS
Over the years, usually in response to logging pressure, the Council of the Haida Nation has identified certain areas of Haida Gwaii of cultural significance. These places have come to be known as 'Haida Protected Areas' and for the most part have been left alone to meet the continuing cultural and societal needs of Haida people.

OLD GROWTH
On Haida Gwaii, as elsewhere, old growth forests are perceived as 'decadent' by a timber industry determined to liquidate these threatened ecosystems and replace them with managed tree farms, also contradictorily known as 'working forest.'

CEDAR
Towering above the forest floor, aged and nurtured over centuries, an ancient cedar tree is one of Haida Gwaii's most impressive and inspiring sights. These pillars of the rainforest are a fixture of the islands' contemporary life and economy, a fountainhead of Haida culture, and a continuous thread linking us with generations past.

ENDANGERED SPECIES

Haida Gwaii's forests are home to more than trees, the temperate wet climate of the rain forest is widely recognized as one of the richest, rarest, most diverse ecosystems in the world. Given the history of industrial activity in the forests, it should come as no surprise that among the many species of plants and wildlife inhabiting the islands, several are on or approaching the brink of extinction.

THE OVERCUT
One of the most long-standing and contentious issues to emerge from the forests on Haida Gwaii revolves around the rate at which the forests themselves are logged, or rate of cut.

DEEP BLUE - FACING THE OCEAN OF ISSUES IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT
It is hard to appreciate that beneath the ocean waves, there is an intensity of life that puts this terrestrial world to shame. For many, even though we are surrounded by saltwater, the ocean is just something we look at and admire - its changing colour, the patterns of wave and wind that move across its surface.
By Lynn Lee - World Wildlife Fund Coordinator

BEAR HUNTING ON HAIDA GWAII

In less than thirty years, over 1000 Black bears have been killed on Haida Gwaii. Since 1977, the majority of these one thousand deaths can be directly connected to two guiding licences. Today, the bear hunting licenses are held by the owners of the Tlell River Lodge, the Prophet Muskwa–Pacific Bear Outfitters company. Despite research indicating growth opportunities in eco-tourism activities, such as bear viewing in their natural habitat, Prophet Muskwa owners Kevin and Victoria Olmstead, continue to run their business based on recreational bear hunting or as it is commonly referred to ‘trophy hunting’. According to Prophet Muskwa’s website bear hunters travelling to Haida Gwaii, ?in the past have had 100% opportunity with about 90% success at taking home a trophy pacific black bear.?

TWO SIDES OF THE BLADE
On a morning last October visitors to the Field Museum in Chicago gathered inside the front door. My daughter, who lives in Chicago, and I were among them. We were there for the performance by Haida dancers listed on the day’s schedule.
By Sandra Price

SO NOW
So now it’s up to the ultimate judicial authority in Canada to determine the ultimate decision-making authority on the Islands. Or to rephrase things through a colloquial, sexist, but easily understood expression – the Supreme Court is gonna tell us who wears the pants on Haida Gwaii.
By Ian Lordon

THE TLELL RIVER PONTOONS - The Tlell River Watershed Legacy Project

Eight kilometers west of Lawn Point lies one of Haida Gwaii’s most distinctive wetlands and it is a landscape rarely encountered along BC’s northern coast. This area known as the Pontoons sweeps across 690 hectares, a mere 30 metres above sea level. Here exists the literal heart of the watershed, where the Tlell’s major tributaries converge and drop their sediment loads before proceeding as one body through forest, towards the sea.
By Erica Thompson

A FALL FROM LEGEND - The Tlell River Watershed Legacy Project
The most curious of fishermen have been known to trail blaze amid deep salal searching for a small lake in the upper reaches of the Tlell watershed. These remote waters are shrouded by legend as liberal as ?the one that got away,? aplace so thick with trout that fishers were advised to beware.
By Erica Thompson

TERRITORY - the Queen Charlotte Bear Show
How many different shades of black are there? How many different ways to look at a bear? Forty-three works of art about bears and territory were entered in the recent art show sponsored by the Gowgaia Institute. The Queen Charlotte venue was the Visitor Information Center, where black display panels were arranged like dark, inter-connecting caves. From them emerged the art works, predominantly black and red: bear fur and bear blood.
Story by Sandra Price, Nov03

TERRITORY - the Masset Bear Show
Meeting a bear, whether in real time or story, is always a Bear Event. There is awe, a current of fear. Recall is in technicolour. The power and grace of bear loping across muskeg, sun glinting black fur silver. Bear swiping a 5 gallon bucket of Rediscovery’s peanut butter, a sorry trail of giant peanut butter poops. Cubs tumbling across a mountain meadow. Bear fishing the Yakoun. Bear on a back porch drunk on brandied fruit. Bear carcasses, a horrid, huge pile of them. Bear turning over rocks for crab along the Narrows.
Story by Jenny Nelson - Nov03

AN INTERVIEW WITH BC ATTORNEY GENERAL GEOFF PLANT
It’s been several years since the provincial, federal and Haida governments have engaged in any kind of meaningful treaty discussions. Consequently the Haida have bypassed the BC treaty process in favour of the courts where they intend to prove their claim to aboriginal title over all of Haida Gwaii. The opening volleys in that legal battle were fired last year when the Haida filed their statement of claim in BC Supreme Court in November. Then early this summer the province fired back with a statement of defence that not only denied all the Haida claims, but also their very existence as a people.

A SUMMARY OF INTERVENOR ARGUMENTS - TFL 39 CASE

GOOD QUESTION!
For the past two months I’ve been wracking my brain, trying to come up with something about seals, which has proven difficult because seals don’t strike me as being particularly funny. Cute maybe, but not funny. I concentrated so much on seals, and drew a blank so many times, it made me cranky. And I’m still cranky.
By Amanda Reid-Stevens, Nov03

WELL, SHIVER ME TIMBERS
The intrigue around BC’s offshore oil and gas prospects thickened recently as the Royal Society of Canada conducted three workshops in October to identify scientific gaps that need to be addressed before the moratorium on offshore drilling can be lifted. The workshops took place in Vancouver and Prince Rupert and capped an eventful year that began with an announcement from the throne in BC’s Legislative Assembly that the 2010 Olympic flame would burn gas piped from beneath the province’s offshore waters.
Story by Ian Lordon, Nov03

AT FIRST U SEE THE ART

Part Two of BOOM! - When you go for a walk in the forest it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the smells, the textures and shapes, by the sunlight streaking through the canopy and the gazillion shades of green. It can be stunningly beautiful, inspiring awe and reverence, but sometimes all that splendour makes it hard to appreciate some of the finer details. Sometimes it’s hard to see the trees for the forest.
By Berry Wjideven, Nov03

THE MESSAGE TO CONVEY IS CHANGE
I write this as a Haida woman, with the views of other Haida who have helped me in relaying the information about climate change and its effects on us and the Islands.

The Haida are responsible for the land and waters, that makes us who we are. The salmon: chiin, halibut:haguu, other fish including shellfish like crab: kustaan, mussels: d’a, clams: gabay; also devilfish: nuu, row on kelp: g’aaw, seaweed: skew, as well as the cedar tree: t’uu, the spruce tree: k’iid, and our traditional plant medicines, these things are part of Haida Gwaii, and are therefore a part of us. We have continued to gather, harvest, and fish for these things since our beginning, and they have shaped us as people as well as nurtured us to grow into the Nation.
Amanda Bedard, Dec04

DOG DAY AFTERNOON
It’s a gorgeous July afternoon, I am walking my dogs along the highway when a logging truck appears behind us. We hug the ditch as the rig roars by leaving behind a cloud of dust and the unmistakable sweet smell of cedar — red cedar.
Berry Wijdeven. Dec04

PLANTS ARE FOR HEALING
In the forest there is a broad, deep green, accordion-pleated leaf of false hellebore. I’d been told the highly poisonous meadow lily, also known as Indian hellebore, was used as a medicine by First Nations people. Curious, I dove into the pages of Nancy Turner’s new book.
Heather Ramsay, Dec04

A CLEARCUT CASE FOR VARIABLE RETENTION
This is not a clearcut. I know, I thought so too. I mean it sure looks like a clearcut. Except for that one lonely tree. Wonder what’s up with that?.
Berry Wijdeven. Dec 04

LODGED IN A TIGHT SPOT
Given the choice between wet boots and a brief moment of indignity, I’ll opt for indignity every time. If there’s one thing I’ve learned in this ever-lengthening life, it’s that in most cases it’s best to allow pride to take a back seat to more pragmatic concerns like common sense. And so it was that I found myself riding piggyback through the shallow waters before Kiusta, an old Haida village at the northwest corner of Graham Island which today looks across Parry Pass at the decidedly occupied and bustling sport fishing community harboured at Henslung Cove on Langara Island.
Ian Lordon, July 03

BOOM!
When artist Kiki van der Heiden left the Netherlands, she walked away from an industrialze country that had sacrificed much of its natural beauty in pursuit of economic prosperity. It is a country where a few years ago a grove of trees was cleared to make room for a sculpture composed of welded metal rods exposed to the elements which dripped rust onto the ground below. The title of the piece was BOOM (Tree) and it created quite a stir, not for what it represented but for what had been scarificed to create it. Along with the public outcry came the realization for many that somewhere along the way their link to the natural environment had been irretrievably lost.
Berry Wijdeven, July 03

A VERY FINE FEELING
Fern and Bob Henderson were weekend wanderers. Walking the forests of the Tlell River was a way they lived their lives together. After arriving on the Islands in the early 1970’s, the couple agreed to make Monday an official part of their weekend so they might better nurture their backcountry curiosities.
Erica Thompson, July 03

HOWL!
Sometimes, if you make enough noise, it's possible to stop something bad from happening. For example, if you were strolling along a pathway through a jungle and all of a sudden a gigantic, hairy, snarling monkey lept out from behind a bush, how would you react? You could turn and bolt, but it's unlikely you could outrun it. Or you and the monkey could wrestle one another to the ground, tumble around for awhile, and try to gnaw each other to death. But then again, you might find yourself considering a third and perhaps smarter option.’.
Amanda Reid-Stevens, July 03

SALMON SCIENCE - The Tlell River Watershed Legacy Project
In the world there is an ancient balance set delicately between abundance and scarcity. In the Pacific northwest the distribution of salmon species, their life cycles, and the geography of their home waters are one of these mystical symmetires.
Erica Thompson, July 03

A VERY FINE FEELING - The Tlell River Watershed Legacy Project
Fern and Bob Henderson were weekend wanderers. Walking the forests of the Tlell River was a way they lived there lives together. After arriving on the Islands in the early 1970's, the couple agreed to make Monday an official part of their weekend so they might better nurture their backcountry curiosities.
Erica Thompson, July 03

FISHING LODGE LOCATION MAP - HAIDA GWAII 2003

SCRATCHING THE SURFACE
We are a society of doodlers. And, so, if for some reason all of the pens and pencils in the world rolled into a hole so deep that we couldn't get at them, would we experience doodle-withdrawal symptoms?.
Amanda Reid-Stevens, April03

A PAPER ON SUSTAINABLE POWER GENERATION
My introduction to renewable energy and energy efficiency started four years ago with the Solar Energy International Foundation in Colorado. Since then, I have worked as a consultant to implement alternative energy on the island. I have gained experience installing solar energy, wind power and micro-hydro systems.
Jacques Morin, April03

THE CONSCIOUS CIVILIZATION - INTERVIEWING JOHN RALSTON SAUL
While accompanying Governor General Adrienne Clarkson during her visit to Haida Gwaii last September, His Excellency John Ralston Saul delivered a public lecture to Islanders at the Visitor Information Center in Queen Charlotte on the subject of Leadership and the Environment. The lecture was the first in the Gowgaia Institute's Speakers' Series, and tied together a broad range of subjects including democracy, Canadian history, the commodities industry, the environmental and aboriginal rights movements, politics and society. In a telephone interview with Spruceroots' Ian Lordon in December, His Excellency found time to answer some questions raised by the lecture from Rideau Hall in Ottawa.

SERVING NOTICE
Late last year in Skidegate, perhaps to avoid any plea of ignorance, tenure holders on Haida Gwaii were brought up to speed on recent developments in aboriginal jurisprudence when they received official warning that they are breaking the law if they fail to consult the Haida and accommodate aboriginal rights before they go about their business
By Ian Lordon, April,03

THE SECRET LIFE OF SNAGS
The Blue Grouse looks around after a ruffle in the red mound. The moments following a bath are the most vulnerable of times. As he scuttles for cover his long squarish tail sweeps against the crumbling stump, whisking wood dust up under his blue grey belly. The irony of finding fleeting relief from parasites in the remains of a five hundred-year-old hemlock is no affair of the grouses.
Erica Thompson, April03

WITHOUT EQUIVOCATION - TFL 39 Case
Well, they asked for it. The latest battle in the ongoing legal war the Haida are waging with the provincial government in BC’s courtrooms was won, once again, by the Council of the Haida Nation.
By Ian Lordon, Nov02

HOW DO YOU SPELL PROTOCOL?
Unity. Harmony.Nice words. There aren’t many on the Islands who wouldn’t like to see them accurately applied to all of our communities, the members of our de facto Haida Gwaii family. And if most of our intentions bend earnestly toward these warm principles, reality breaks down into something closer to a tangle of pent, frayed, and restless brats in the back seat on an endless road trip, howling uselessly or embroiled in childishly imaginative turf wars with no stops for the can, or even a chance to sretch the legs.
Ian Lordon, Nov02.

TLELL ME ABOUT IT

I am tidying my children’s bedroom and see the sculpture. Looking closely I recall its story.I remember a piece of art made earlier by two children, David and Preston Sloan, for the Tlell Art Show. It was made of moss, a bit of fern, a bear, an eagle, some PlaySkool figures out for a picnic and it was set in the context of wooden rainbows, letters to a river and the life cycle of a shipwreck.
Michelle Deakin, Nov02

ALIEN INVASION

In 1792, the Spanish tried to introduce pigs to Haida Gwaii. The explorers of the day set loose domestic animals in an attempt to ensure an abundant source of animal protein for the colonizing settlers to come
John Farrell - Nov02

WHIRRLED OR SPLAYED
I didn’t get much sleep last night, and it occurred to me this morning, as my forehead was resting in my cereal bowl, that flies aren’t very useful. I don’t know what brought that thought to mind, but the more I mulled it over, the more I became convinced that I was wrong.
Amanda Reid-Stevens, Nov02

IN THE SALMON'S SHADOW
On the night of August 14th a Ford Econoline van drove out of the dark and into the illuminated mouth of the Queen of the North. For the ten passengers rolling on-board, the bright sodium lamps of the midnight ferry signaled the beginning of a two week journey. It was a trip with a very specific mission — to shadow salmon
Erica Thompson, Nov02

ON PROTESTING - IN THE COMPANY OF MANY GOOD WOMEN AND A
FEW GOOD MEN
Living on Haida Gwaii, as I do, the daily influences of my life are very different from what most (urban) Canadians experience.
MC Davies, April02

THE MEASURE OF CONTROL
Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson has waited a long time for this. ?It’s why I went to law school.? It, of course, is the Council of the Haida Nation’s attempt to become the first to prove title to their traditional territory in court.
Ian Lordon, April02

LUMBERING ALONG
Jim Abbott’s desk is littered with opportunities. They’re usually in the form of emails from foreign and domestic companies looking for a steady supply of wood products, the very thing his company, Abfam Enterprises, is in the business of supplying from it’s mill in Port Clements.
Ian Lordon, April02

THE ARTFUL DODGER - TFL 39 Case
This, in a nutshell, is why the Council of the Haida Nation was in Vancouver before the BC Court of Appeal on February 8th. The CHN was appealing a trial court ruling made in Masset a year and a half ago, denying their petition to quash the year 2000 replacement of
TFL 39, Block 6 — the licence which allows Weyerhaeuser to log on Haida Gwaii for the next 25 years.
Ian Lordon, Feb02

FINDING ACCOMMODATION - TFL 39 Case
The BC Court of Appeal gave the province an anticipated shove towards the negotiating table when it ruled the year 2000 transfer and replacement of TFL 39 were illegal on February 27.
Ian Lordon, Feb02

THE TAKU DECISION
In January 2002 the BC Supreme Court tackled an issue with implications for ever First Nation in the province when it upheld a ruling on a petition submitted by the Taku River Tlingit First Nation.
Ian Lordon, Feb02

BEAR FAT MAKES THE BEST BISCUITS
I am not a hunter. It’s not that I have anything against guns either. I’ve handled guns, fired them at targets: Bull’s-eyes, bottles, cans, and skeets. In responsible, capable hands I’m quite comfortable with them. Guns are tools, like an axe, a hammer, or a wheelbarrow, only there’s a mystique around guns owing to their purpose: Guns are designed to kill.
Ian Lordon, Feb02

BUNKERED WITH BINOS IN A SOUTH-EAST WIND
Masset resident, Peter Hamel, is one of Canada’s top birders and holds the record for seeing the most bird species in Canada in a single year. When he first came to Haida Gwaii on sabbatical in 1982 he organized a Christmas Bird Count. The yearly counts have been going on ever since. Peter now lives in Masset and during a recently delayed ferry trip home aboard BC Ferries’ Queen of Prince Rupert we had a chance to talk about birds. Margo Hearne, Feb02

A TALE OF FAST FLOWS AND SPONGY FISH
Driving the muddy logging roads between September and December you might happen upon a bunch of people dressed in funny suits looking like they just landed from Mars or stepped from the pages of a superhero comic. Dressed in colourful spongy suits with mask and breathing apparatus, they are clearly out of their element. When you enquire as to what they’re doing on a chilly fall day, they enthusiastially tell you they are off to snorkel the river and count fish! O?kay, but why?
Lisa Bland, Feb02

IN THE WATER COLUMN
Turning contaminated environments into organic wonder-ands,? is the calling card of a small outfit of biologists and engineers working from the community of Robert’s Creek on the Sunshine Coast. One of their missions is to create solutions that will restore bays, foreshore areas and fish creeks contaminated by debris laden run-off and toxic effluent originating at dryland sorts. Solving environmental problems generated at log sorts is no small feat considering there are 117 active sites on Vancouver Island alone and thirteen operating on Haida Gwaii.
Erica Thompson, Feb02

SOMA: STORM CLOUD FULL OF LIFE

Amanita muscaria, the very name rolls off the tongue like an incantation. The siren red cap
dappled with white warts bursts onto the forest floor like a celebrity diva into a room full of suits. An object of worship, a history of messing with the minds of men, she has a dark, mysterious, and mythical past. Rumored to be deadly, she never-the-less appeals to children, the imagination, and inspires art, prose, rhyme, and song. She is a queen among mushrooms - apparitions from the underworld.
Ian Lordon, Dec01

HEARING IMPAIRED - OIL AND GAS
The government finally showed up to hear what people on Haida Gwaii think about lifting the moratorium on offshore oil and gas exploration on November 28th, and what a pathetic excuse for government it was.
Dec01

MOWING THE LAWN
A Ministry of Forests proposal to log behind Lawn Hill met with concern and resistance when Small Business Program manager, Rick Johnson, presented it to area residents in late September.
Dec01

BIRDING FOR YUKON GOLD
A Ministry of Forests proposal to log behind Lawn Hill met with concern and resistance when Small Business Program manager, Rick Johnson, presented it to area residents in late September.
Margo Hearne, Dec01

SWIVELING HEADS AND GOO GOO EYES

Ever wonder about the biological catch phrase, 'sub-species'? Genetically distinct creatures, like the Queen Charlotte blackbear and the Queen Charlotte ermine, are celebrated and studied as living evidence of the Island's ancient story including the arrivals and departures of ice ages, continental and oceanic plates. Well, there is one a little quieter than the others, one who still manages to evade the bright eyes of scientific inquiry.
Erica Thompson, Sept01

COMMON SENSE ON GLOBALIZATION
A good friend of mine has taken to reading MacLean's magazine a little fervently. This is unusual, given that in the early years of our acquaintance she tended to ignore mainstream media, the events and the persons it portrayed, almost entirely.
Ian Lordon, September 01

A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF DEER PRESENCE ON INSECT COMMUNITIES
Studies of the impact of deer on plant communities have shown that deer can greatly affect the structure and abundance of understory vegetation. This can, in turn strongly affect the songbird communities by reducing nest sites and habitat of birds using the understory. Another impact of deer on bird communities might be a reduction of the main food resource of songbirds-insects.
Sylvain Allombert, Sept01

REEF, LOW & LIMESTONE
On June 27 the Research Group on Introduced Species invited guests from communities on-Island to its main study site at Laskeek Bay. The outing was organised to share the findings of the Research Group on Introduced Species (RGIS) project and to show comparative vegetation and fauna on islands with deer (East Limestone) to islands with no deer (Low island), or that had deer but where they had been culled 4 years ago (Reef Island).
Jean-Louis Martin, Sept01

WEAVING ART AND POLITICS

It is a thursday afternoon and Vicky Moody is framing in windows. She is building a new studio at her home in Skidegate and this 'do it yourself' determination seems to characterize the way she pursues her visions. "If someone can do it, it can't be impossible."
Erica Thompson, Feb01

ALL THE FACTS FOR TITLE - TFL 39 Case
The decision came down on November 21 and it was, in many respects, an appealing one. In a case challenging Weyerhaeuser's right to log on Haida Gwaii, round one of the Council of the Haida Nation and Guujaaw v. The Minister of Forests and Weyerhaeuser Company Ltd. went to the defence as Justice D. A. Halfyard decided the 1980, 1995, and 2000 replacements of Tree Farm Licence 39 were legal.
Ian Lordon, Feb01

THE BOXY DANCE OF DISCOURSE
The foxtrot and forest management are strangely alike in their ability to imply movement, through the repetition of steps, without actually going anywhere. The foxtrot moves in currents of left foot forward, right foot forward, left foot to the side, right foot to the side, left foot backwards, and so on – creating an endless link of boxes though never moving forward. Ministerial forestry often smacks of this same shimmy, leading public expectation with win-dixy foot-work, promises and stylized words through a routine that most often ends only where it began.
Erica Thompson, Feb01

EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT ABALONE BUT ...
The first people of Haida Gwaii/Queen Charlotte Islands call them by many different names, among them gaalahlyan, galgaahliiyaang and galguuhlkyan. In Haida legend, it is said that the northern abalone descended from the northwestern toad during k'áy gang, the "Time of the Raven."
Lynn Lee, Feb01

ABALONE SEX
The life of an abalone begins with conception. Unlike our familiar concepts, abalone conception doesn't begin inside a mature animal – it occurs in the seawater column! Abalone are broadcast spawners – adult abalone of separate sexes release millions of eggs and sperm into the water and there it must meet. A rather optimistic way to get together in all that fluid space! As you can imagine, many eggs and many sperm must be released at the same time in the same place for fertilization to succeed.
Lynn Lee, Feb01

GUNNY SACKS AND INNER TUBES
The first time I saw abalone they were in a gunny sack carried by my grandfather. Water dripped through the bottom of the heavy bag onto the back steps of our house in San Diego, California. Grandpa looked pleased standing there in shorts and rubber boots. That morning he and my dad had followed the tide out on to a rocky point.
Charlotte Tarve, February 01

TONNES O'BUCKS
For over 7,000 years, coastal First Nations people along the British Columbia coastline harvested abalone for food, decoration and currency for trade. Harvesting was by hand picking in the intertidal at low tides and by using a two-pronged spear able to reach down 6 feet below the surface. Diving was not known as a harvest method and thus, only the intertidal and a very small portion of the upper subtidal abalone population was exploited by traditional First Nations fisheries. In the early days, Haida people traveling to the Skeena and the Nass Rivers had also sold dried abalone to the Chinese.
Lynn Lee, February 01

UP SHIFT GRIND - FIND THE GEAR FOR A SUSTAINABLE FISHERY
For millennia abalone flourished in the waters of Haida Gwaii, a commercial fishery started around 1910 with canning for "the Oriental market" at Jedway Bay. There is relatively little information about the abalone harvest from 1910 through to 1952 and it is typified as 'erratic' and 'low-level'. A record 30.6 tonnes canned in 1928 was not exceeded until 1964. More typically, fewer than 7 tonnes per year was processed at canneries in Jedway, and Bella Bella and Alert Bay on the central coast of BC.
Brigid Cumming, February 01

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING IN THE WORLD
"I grew up picking abalone on the beaches of South Moresby," says Roy Jones Jr., CheeXial Taaiixou, Chief of Tanu Raven Wolf clan. "It's an essential part of our traditional food." Chief CheeXial and I are making our way through less traditional fare - hot Cajun-chicken Caesar salads at the Yakoun River Inn. It is mid-January and he has agreed to talk about abalone which is the focus of a multi-year multi-partner pilot project to restore stocks here on Haida Gwaii. St
Brigid Cumming, February 01

UNITY RALLY - PUBLIC COMMENT NOT COMING

Islanders can be forgiven if they are under the impression the province really doesn't care what they have to say. After all, meetings, letters, public input, petitions, lobbying and complaints by locals have had very little effect on what happens in the woods on Haida Gwaii.
Ian Lordon, February 01

COFFEE CLUTCH
Facing down pepper spray and tear gas is not an easy way to throw off the yoke of globalization. A growing number of activists are finding shareholder action to be an equally dramatic tool for social change.
John M Farrell, July 01

DROPLETS OF H20
Some scientists consider fog as far more than a picturesque veil concealing coastal landscapes and oceanic climes. A closer look reveals the tiny droplets that make up fog are vital contributors to the forest ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest. Fog, it is said, may be the most underrated agent in supporting the largest living conifers on the planet.
Erica Thompson, July 01

THE LANGUAGE OF LOGGING
The most powerful phrase in British Columbia just might be "adequately manage and conserve." This prime provision in managing and conserving forest resources is embedded deep within the Forest Practices Code at Section 41(1)(b), but finding evidence of these protective promises is more difficult to locate on the ground than on the page. What it means to 'adequately manage and conserve' is widely interpreted and contested and considering its legacy is converting ancient forests to farms, Section 41 has come to be known as a firebrand in forest politics..
Erica Thompson, July 01

HIDDEN DRAGON, STINGING NETTLES
My most memorable encounter with stinging nettles was not good. On my way to a morning paddle, I slipped into the woods to change into swim trunks when misfortune stuck, or more like when I struck it. In the midst of changing my clothes, I began wobbling on one foot while the other was caught up in a pant leg. I started turning in circles and then I stumbled, blundered really, right into the teeth of the green dragon, bare bottomed as only bare bottomed can be.
Erica Thomspon, July 01

THE ANATOMY OF A SPILL
"I was going for a free ride." Early in the afternoon of November 6 Jim Dziedzic found himself careening downhill at ninety kilometres an hour in the wrong lane banging against a concrete abutment with no steering, the hood of his Esso truck blocking his view, and over 50,000 litres of fuel following right behind him..
Ian Lordon, July 01

ENDANGERED SPECIES - GOSHAWK

Haida Gwaii's forests are home to more than trees, the temperate wet climate of the rain forest is widely recognized as one of the richest, rarest, most diverse ecosystems in the world. Given the history of industrial activity in the forests, it should come as no surprise that among the many species of plants and wildlife inhabiting the islands, several are on or approaching the brink of extinction..
June 01

RECIPE FOR A CRUMBLING CAKE
For weeks, months, even years, it was an indispensable if innocuous part of the routine for the fifteen or so members of the table charged with planning the future of the Tlell River watershed - Cacilia Honisch's lemon bread. Four nights a month, when table members gathered at Cacilia's bed and breakfast to review information and argue the details of the Tlell Local Resource Use Plan, lemon bread was always there for the asking - a welcome accompaniment to a cup of coffee and nearly four hours of often mundane, at times controversial, debate, discussion, and decision-making.'
Ian Lordon, July 01

SOFT WOOD, HARD HEADS

For Canadian lumber producers, it's like looking down the barrel of a shotgun. One barrel contains 40 per cent in countervailing duties, the other, 36 per cent in anti-dumping duties. Now it's just a matter of whether the US Department of Commerce and the International Trade Commission pulls the trigger.
Mark Stephens, July 01

COMMON SENSE ON GLOBALIZATION

A good friend of mine has taken to reading MacLean's magazine a little fervently. This is unusual, given that in the early years of our acquaintance she tended to ignore Ian Lordon, July 01

UNITY RALLY - TODAY THE PEOPLE OF HAIDA GWAII WALKED TOGETHER
Four hundred people stood before a small government office in the cool late afternoon light and announced their ownership of a shared past and future. Ada Yovanovitch, Watson Price, and Ethel Jones sat side by side again as they had 15 years ago on Lyell Island. The District Manager, Rory Annett insisted responsibility for our dissatisfaction could not be found within the offices behind him. The elders had heard it all many times before.
Gerry Morigeau, December 00

PHOTO ESSAY OF A POLE BEING CARVED AT SKIDEGATE
This is a photo essay of a totem pole being carved at Skidegate, Haida Gwaii. The photos show the carving process from raw log to finished pole. The pole was carved by Guujaaw, Gwaii Edenshaw, and Wayne Edenshaw.
S Davies, March 97

HACKING DOWN THE GARDEN
In the beginning (according to some), there was Haida Gwaii. The raven welcomed the first men as they struggled from the shell, then tricked and taught them as they settled the islands of the archipelago. For thousands of years the Haida lived in harmony with the land and sea, and both answered every need of the people. When the ancestors took from the forest, the rivers, or ocean, a ceremony of some kind usually accompanied the harvest. These rituals were performed to honour or thank the forces that helped sustain the people, and it was good.
Ian Lordon, December 00

RED BERRY GREEN TREE

Even to those who have celebrated a century of living, the yew tree is long an elder. Venerated as one of the oldest beings on earth the yew is said to be only less ancient than the world itself.
Erica Thompson, December 00

STRANGE BEING

The first hint of something strange surfaced in 1984 during a sea-floor mapping exercise in Hecate Strait. Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) scientists observed through sonar imaging, unexpected permeable bumps over huge areas of the sea floor. Similar acoustic anomalies, described as an "amorphous, irregular seismic signature having no coherent internal reflectors," were observed again in 1986, this time during a survey in Queen Charlotte Sound. In 1987, GSC scientists Kim Conway and Vaughn Barrie discovered the sponge reef. It was "something that succeeded even our expectations," says Conway.
Lynn Lee, December 00

LOG IT AND LEAVE IT
Logging has been approved by District Manager, Rory Annett for Maude Island and in Jiinanga (Government Creek) the last untouched watershed in Skidegate Inlet. In response to community concerns, Mr. Annett stated in his approval letter that he is "satisfied that the plan will adequately manage and conserve the forest resources." This, despite the fact that Mr. Annett is aware of the historical public opposition to logging in the inlet without public process.
Dec00

GIVING AND RECEIVING

I am very grateful to be aware of so many blessings in this life. For me, no thing is greater than the feeling of being loved and accepted by other people. I enjoyed a pronounced sense of this recently while in service to others. I had been asked to pick cedar for a ceremony and a short time later I found myself strolling in the sunshine through a forest glistening with fresh rain.
Alexander MacDonald, Dec00

Tthow Hegwelth : THE SOUND OF MANY COPPER SHIELDS
She offers me thick, black, coffee wrapped in fine bone china. A collection of Russian glassware from another era stands in a display cabinet next to her front door- but it's easy to overlook when faced with an imposing canvass marked by Bill Reid's passing hand. The television is on. The house is tidy and modern, full of light and windows. The dining set is old; heavy and solid. September/October 2000

DRAWING CONNECTIONS

Could there be a better way to herald the beginning of a monumental project intended to preserve, celebrate, and nourish Haida culture than by raising half a dozen Haida monuments?
Ts'aahl Pole - Garner Moody
K'uuna (Skedans) Pole - Jim Hart
Sgaang Gwaii Pole - Tim Boyko
T'aanuu Pole - Giitsxaa
Skidegate Pole - Norman Price
Cumshewa Pole - Guujaaw
Ian Lordon - September/October 2000

CHOOSING THE PATH - TFL 39 Case

The jury is still out, or in this case, the judge. Justice Halfyard, who heard the Council of the Haida Nation's petition challenging the last three renewals of Weyerhaeuser's Tree Farm Licence 39 in August, has yet to reach a decision in the case.
Sept/Oct00

HOW MUCH IS BEING LOGGED AND HOW MANY JOBS ARE THERE?
The following numbers have been collected by the Gowgaia Institute in response to questions from the public.

SONG OF THE DODO - ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY IN AN AGE OF EXTINCTION

David Quammen's The Song of the Dodo, the result of ten years of research and travel, presents an extrordinary account of species' origins, distribution and extinctions on islands and island-like landscapes. A colourful tour through rain forests, rivers, national parks and clearcuts, this captivating read launches off with evolutionists Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace and continues through the last century priming readers for the contemporary quandaries of rare and endangered species and the unprecedented loss of global habitat.

EXPO 2000: HUMANKIND, NATURE AND TECHNOLOGY
Following the closure of EXPO on October 31 pavilions will be reused, redeveloped, and recycled. An example of such recycling is Japan's pavilion. Using a paper tube technique, Japan built its pavilion from recycled paper. Paper membranes allowed natural light to enter the hall and the effect was very soothing, like a lampshade. Upon closure of EXPO, the paper tubes will be sent to a paper mill for recycling.
Astrid Greene, photos by Tom Greene, Sept/Oct 00

THE PONTOONS
Located at the centre of the Tlell watershed, the pontoons are a gathering place for an entire ecosystem. Elk, deer, songbirds, migratory birds, fish, bears, and most of all, water converge at the heart of one of Haida Gwaii's largest watersheds.
June 00

WEIGHING IN FOR THE TITLE CHALLENGE - TFL 39 CASE
A decision with the potential to affect nearly everyone on Haida Gwaii could be made in Masset at the end of July when the court will hear a petition launched by the Council of the Haida Nation (CHN) aimed at quashing the replacement of Weyerhaeuser's Tree Farm Licence 39, Block 6.
Ian Lordon, June00

BEGGING FOR BERRIES
In mid-April I received my copy of Seeing the Forest Beneath the Trees: The Social and Economic Potential of Non-Timber Forest Products and Services In the Queen Charlotte Islands/Haida Gwaii.
Brigid Cumming, June00

STREAMS OF CONSCIOUS
How many islands make up Haida Gwaii? Two answers come to mind. The firsts, constructed from a string of measurements - 138 islands in the archipelago, 42 fresh water lakes, over 1,600 kilometres of shoreline and mountain peaks surpassing 1,000 metres above the surrounding sea level, all embodied 100 kilometres from BC's northern coastline ...
Erica Thompson, June00

THE OUTER LIMITS
Ecological Economics At first glance it may strike some as a contradiction in terms, an incongruous conjunction, two concepts that simply don't belong together. Like industrial park, unbiased reporting, or rap singer.
Ian Lordon, June00

REAL LIFE RESEARCH: FLYING IN TO LIMESTONE
I left for Limestone on a bright April morning. Sea and mountains sparkled as our small floatplane headed south. I've been on the board of the Laskeek Bay Conservation Society (LBCS) since December 1998, but this would be my first experience volunteering at the Field Research Station on East Limestone Island (ELI) in Laskeek Bay.
Brigid Cumming, May00

RED HERRING NOT ENDANGERED, GOSHAWK IS
One species which you won't find on federal Minister of Environment David Anderson's endangered species list is the red herring. This slippery denizen of the sea is in shocking abundance, revealing itself in full colour throughout the new federal Species at Risk Act. However new the endangered species shell game is in Ottawa, there is a legacy of provincial management which begs us to question the direction our governments are taking.
Erica Thompson, May00

THIS IS A STORY WITH WHICH YOU ARE FAMILIAR
I grew up in a suburban part of Alberta. This place, Kumdis Island on Haida Gwaii, and my hometown bear little resemblance...at least on the surface. Throughout my childhood my subconscious would often link together the scraps of surviving scrubby brush, the carefully managed storm sewer system, the isolated swamps, the feral farmlands, and so linked, these spaces restored themselves in my imagination. These broken survivors of urban sprawl; these oasis from asphalt-stripmall-desertification, could, with a child's willing, once again become what Kumdis Island still is today. Wilderness.
Gerry Morigeau, May00

QUESTION: HOW DO YOU ADD VALUE TO A THREE-LEGGED DOG?
A youngster from Haida Gwaii was sacrificed to debut in an off-Broadway, avant-garde, multi-media theatre performance in New York city. If this strikes anyone as farfetched it will only seem more so in light of the fact that the performerhappens to be a second-growth red cedar tree.
Ian Lordon, May00

I MAY NOT BE AN EARTHQUAKOLOGIST ... BUT I SURE KNOW HOW TO SHAKE UP A DINNER PARTY
I've spent a good part of my life wondering about a number of things that relate to people, animals, strange phenomena, and the world at large. If I were a disciplined person, I might do some research and find answers to many of my questions. Unfortunately, I'm not a disciplined person, and there's not much chance of me becoming one.
Amanda Reid-Stevens, May00

GREY WHALES REALLY SMART!
The simple fact that grey whales spend the winters feeding and breeding in the warm sunshine and serene lagoons along the coast of Baja California and Mexico should be enough to persuade anyone with lingering doubts that homo sapiens cannot claim the mantle of most intelligent species on earth.
Ian Lordon, May00

PLAYING GAMES
Two games to play - Eagle Eyes and Bear Nose ...
Compiled by Mare Davies, May00

WE WILL DRAW THE CURTAIN AND SHOW YOU THE PICTURE
Five years ago another strange thing happened on Haida Gwaii. It was around the time when the Ministry of Forests was getting close to the end of a 'process' (Okay, nothing strange about that. But wait a minute, the strange part is coming).
Ian Lordon, Mar00

AUDIBLE LANDSCAPES - DAWN CHORUS IN THE TLELL WATERSHED
The first challenge of Dr. Tarmo Poldmaa's day is to rouse eight students, a few parents, and teacher Mark Ruzylo from sleep. Waking such a large group, coaxing them from their warm sleeping bags and out into the forest all before 4:30 in the morning strikes most of us as an unattractive challenge by any early morning standard. It is so early, PM has just slipped into the AM, but there is a trail of kids hiking out into the Tlell's forests bent on beating the first light.
Erica Thompson, Mar00

DOG, FISH, ROLLING, ROLLING, ROLLING
Research on salmon has been conducted close to 100 years, but not until the last decade has one of the most important links been discovered between spawning salmon and ecosystems; a link which is obvious to many, especially gardeners. The return of salmon to their natal stream (place of hatch) is vitally important to the function of ecosystems on the coast and has been for thousands of years.
David Loewen, Mar00

WASTE NOT THE COCKLES
Meandering through a maze of U-Pick strawberry fields is as close as some of us get to harvesting what we eat. Spending time outdoors collecting the bounty of nature seems to have been reduced to a recreational past time for self-esteem building. And, in a society where major transportation infrastructures turn local foods into global commodities, there is a tendency not to consider where food came from, or what we have, until it's gone.
Nicholas Reynolds, March 00

SANCTUARY AT KUMDIS
Islanders pass over the Kumdis River on their way to Port Clements or Masset everyday. A highway, a bridge, a river, an inlet, so it seems from a truck window. But, if we were to follow the river on foot to where it settles out over the salt-water body of the Masset Inlet we would encounter, in the mingling waters, both a river's ending and the richest of beginnings.
Erica Thompson, March 00

CUTTING CONTIGUOUS CORRIDORS
[with photos of Weyerhaueser variable retention zones]
"Contiguous" is one word which sees a lot of action around here. But just what it means and how it is used depends heavily on the eyes of the beholder and the tongue of the speaker - especially when used to describe forest landscapes.
Erica Thompson, March 00

RECONCILING DIFFERENCES AND INSPIRING CHANGE
In 1982, before the fight for South Moresby reached its peak, before Gwaii haanas emerged scarred, wounded, but safely from the ring, a group of peopl were sitting at a planning table in Sandspit. At the table were representatives from government and industry, community members, environmentalists, and some Haida people. In fact, the table and the group assembled around it were not unlike many groups and tables we've seen on Haida Gwaii today, nor from the hundreds of groups and tables we've seen in the years between. But what's interesting about that particular table from June in 1982 is that Guujaaw decided to write about it in the QCI Observer ...
Ian Lordon, February 00

A VERITABLE RETENTION OF THE AAC

They are BIG and they are everywhere -- it is 'variable retention' gone wild! You can see it for yourself: cutblocks creeping up to 200 hectares in size. They are monstrous and make up the majority of Weyerhaeuser's 2000-2004 Forest Development Plan.
Erica Thompson, February 00

BIRDS BACK, RATS RAZED
The colony of Ancient Murrelets on Langara Island appears to be bouncing back.
Mark Drever, February 00

LAKE STILL FULL
How many ways are there to start a stalled car? The government is back at the wheel trying once again to get information flowing around the proposed hydro-electric development at Takakia Lake.
Erica Thompson, February 00

NOT A POPULAR NOTION
I'm fed up with Haida Gwaii being the subject of one giant-ass resource extaction "experiment." Read on ...
Amanda Reid-Stevens, February 00

SLOW DRIP - MINISTER'S "QUIET CONSULTATION" UP FOR ROUND 2
The slick drive to lift the federal and provincial moratorium on offshore drilling and exploration for oil and gas in Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound is moving along. this story brings you up to date with the latest.
Ian Lordon, February 00

LOONEY TUNE
S
Hang on to your wallet because you're going to pay if Husby Forest Products can't log in Duu Guusd. If this strikes some as absurd, think again. Haida Gwaii's second largest logging company is putting itself in position to claim compensation from the provincial government if it isn't allowed to cut a big chunk out of the forests the Council of the Haida Nation designated as protected in 1982.
Ian Lordon, November 99

SAFTEY NET OR MANAGING TO EXTINCTION
It was one winter's night and the winds were thunderous. Under the hissing rafters of Charlotte's United Church a group of Islanders sat back on their chairs ears pricked to the deliberations of Forest Practices Board Chair Keith Moore and Ministry of Forests District Manager Rory Annett. The star of the show was the Forest Practices Code and during that south-easter, in front of the church stage, the speakers seemed to transform into a protagonist and antagonist of a legal drama where dark shadows hang around the meanings of words, where risk, landscapes, legacy and public voice have more meanings than you could have ever expected.
Erica Thompson, Nov99

FALLING DOWN ON MUSHROOMS
Last month in the article - Stiking a balance between making a living and the living forest -
I summarized the Islands mushroom industry in two paragraphs. Not long after the story came out, Brian Pearson called me and it didn't take him long to convince me I needed to do a follow-up article focussing just on mushrooms, clarifying some points and expanding others.
The Biology of Mushrooms
Picking, Buying and Selling
Brigid Cumming, Nov99

TIME FOR CHANGE - TENURE REDISTRIBUTION
Rights to harvest timber in BC are very concentrated, both in terms of who holds the rights and in the licensing arrangements through which these rights are allocated. According to the 1991 Forest Resources Commission, in 1954 the ten largest forestry companies held 37% of the cut allocated to licensees, in 1975 the ten largest held 59%, and in 1990 they controlled 69%. In 1998, six forestry companies controlled nearly 50% of the total commitments to licensees. Furthermore, if the proposed Weyerhaeuser-MacMillan Bloedel and Canfor-Northwood takeovers are completed, just two companies will control more than a fifth of the volume of wood cut on public land.
Jessica Clogg, Nov99, reprinted with permission

GROW YOUR OWN FURNITURE
A British furniture designer has set a high standard for energy conservation and sustainable production: he coaxes trees to grow furniture.
Dan Johnson, Nov99, reprinted with permission

10-YEARS OF BIRDS, DARK NIGHTS, PEOPLE AND WHALES
The Laskeek Bay Conservation Society (LBCS) is a group of volunteers on Haida Gwaii dedicated to increasing public understanding of the natural world.

IRONS IN THE FIRE
Ever since the first ship appeared off the coast of Haida Gwaii, the first mission established itself to "educate the savages," and the first settlers arrived to cultivate and subdue the wild landscape of these islands, the question of ownership and accommodation between two cultures has been a source of contention, confusion, and often anger.
Ian Lordon, Sept99

MOUNTAINS OF MISSING INFORMATION
A friend in public relations once told me when pitching a sale, information is at a premium, answer only what has been asked, he said, and on no account offer up anything for free. On the more pertinent issues - it comes down to tight lips and timing. The future of Queen Charlotte Power Corporation's bid for a water license at Takakia Lake is still in the dark and two months after the Skidegate and Sandspit public hearings little light has been shed on the mountain of information absent from the discussion.
Erica Thompson, Sept99

FLYING TO TEXAS ... FOR MILK!
I believe that good things come from good communication. If you read this article in its entirety, you're going to be communicated with so well and thoroughly that, as you near the end of it, you might find yourself rolling your eyeballs, heaving noisy sighs, and accusing me of being preachy. But that's okay. Really.
Amanda Reid-Stevens, Sept99

STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN MAKING A LIVING AND THE LIVING FOREST
First, definitions: NTFPs are "anything other than saw logs or pulpwood" that comes out of the forest. Anything botanical, that is; deer and other forest fauna are not included, but they could be. NTFPs were originally studied in tropical rainforests. The shift in research to temperate rainforests is relatively recent, although in practical terms harvesting NTFP's has been around for as long as cone and mushroom picking and shake-bolt cutting. Interestingly, most long-range plans focus on making yields larger and more predictable -- farming the forest, rather than foraging in it. In BC, NTFPs fall into one of two categories: Special Forest Products and Botanical Forest Products.
Brigid Cumming, Sept99

TIRES, OLD LUMBER AND STRAWBERRIES
Along the shoreline of Masset Inlet, where cedar forests and berry patches have been cleared for housing, sandy ground lies exposed. Only grasses and clover thrive in the empty lots. Holding out, here and there, against the winds are single stalks of white blossomed yarrow. But inside a high grey fence grows one yarrow plant so tall, so thick with stems and flowers, a lanky man's arms couldn't encircle it.
Cassandra Price, Sept 99

LOGGING AS IF COMMUNITIES MATTERED

In 1992, the Forest Resources Commission of British Columbia (BC's fifth forestry commission) completed their mandate and presented to the B.C. Legislature a report containing more than three hundred recommendations addressing concerns with forestry in the province. The establishment of two community log yards in BC directly results from this Forest Resources Commission..
Paul Mitchell Banks, May 99

TAKAKIA LAKE HEARINGS

On June 9 and 10 hearings were held to inquire into the Water Licence application by Queen Charlotte Power Corporation to divert water from Takakia Lake. On June 9 at Skidegate Hall about 50 people turned out to witness and voice their opinions about the licence. Chiefs of the Haida Nation spoke to the issue as did representatives of the Skidegate Language Program. Individuals from all Island communities addressed the inquiry and entered their opinions in writing to the record. Following is the paper presented by Jennifer White, of Queen Charlotte.
Jennifer White, April 99

A SIMPLICITY OF LINE AND FORM

For the past 20 years, artist Jeff Greene has been re-igniting his interest in the Haida art form. After a two-year absence from his home village of Skidegate, Nunstints is returning to unveil his first art exhibition. Born at Skidegate in 1959, Nunstints (Jeff Greene) of the Taas Alaanaas clan (Sand People from the Eagle Clan) is one of a few artists keeping the traditional Haida form alive today. His pencil drawings, limited edition prints, paintings on Japanese Glass Balls and deerskin drums, all reflect Jeff's dedication to the Haida form.
David Wiwchar, April 99

LONG LIVE CRABAPPLE CREEK

We are civilized, we know, we say so. We are civilized because we agree on it. The uncivilized barbarians of the past were always those who disagreed. We are now so civilized that we write everything down; the ardor and control of writing it is the authority by which the words and concepts became absolute. Referencing a book confirms or denies a truth. But, in this world, governing and controlling the written precept necessitates enforcers. We got cops and judges - part and parcel, and we got civilization. The tightness and completeness of our organization defines our first world-ness, others are considered third-world. We're organized, we agree, and we're "right" because we say so in writing.
Ralph Nelson, April 99

HEY, ARE YOU A LOCAL?

Hey Dan, do you consider yourself a local? My face went flush, and I thought, "what the !" Why do they want to know that? Is this a test? Maybe if I say the wrong thing, I'll never get into "the club." You know that exclusive club of "locals." Hey, I've worn my gumboots into City Centre - doesn't that make me local? Guess not.
Dan Adamson, April 99

AN URGE TO DIG

Elsie Weintraub looked around her home. Nearly every bit of flat surface -- table, countertop, wood stove, dresser, windowsill -- was covered with trays of peat pots exploding with green seedlings. The seeds had been planted right after the last snow melted and now it was time for them to go into the ground, miserable weather or not. It was Victoria Day weekend and already some seedlings were in blossom.
Cassandra Price, April 99

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF CHIEF COUNCILLOR KIM DAVIDSON
It's twenty minutes past eight on a Thursday morning in the Old Massett village office. The coffee is on and it's fresh, but already most of it's gone. The phones are ringing and there are a few people milling about in the reception area. Every now and then one of the staff emerges from the corridor of offices to exchange messages with Mary, the secretary, who juggles the handset while she handles questions.
Ian Lordon, April 99

ARTISTS WALK

The artists and guides pose before spending the day of March 20 in the Tlell area. The walk was preparation for an open-community art show about the watershed that gets underway April 23, at the Haida Gwaii Museum at Qay'llnagaay. The show is sponsored by the Tlell Watershed Society and Friends of Tlell..
April 99

GO AND LOOK AT IT
These days it is harder to sell wood from BC - we don't have a good name internationally. People, businesses and countries are refusing wood from clearcuts and old growth forests; they are looking for wood that is certified sustainably harvested "green" - it's the consumer's choice.
Ralph Nelson, April 99

WATER FLOWING TO THE SEA - THE TLELL LEGACY PROJECT

There's a lot going on in the Tlell, the community and the watershed. There's soccer fields and an OCP. There's a CHN Protected Area, a TFL, a TSA, private lands. There's a Timber Supply Review, a SMOOP, a Forest Development Plan, an LRUP with an Interim Development Plan, soon to come a Regional Landscape Unit Plan (per the BC Forest Practices Code), and maybe even some day an LRMP. And then there's fishing trips, hikes to the falls, looking for elk. Steelhead moving up, Ta'an lifting a sleepy nose into the breeze. The rain falls, filling channels, flooding wetlands, coursing through the canyon and forest, under the bridge and out to sea.
April 99

BC GETS FIRST ECO-CERTIFIED WOODLOT

On March 11, 1999, the Silva Forest Foundation announced the certification of Rod Blake's 600 hectare woodlot in central British Columbia. After careful evaluation and broad consultation, the Silva Forest Foundation (SFF) has awarded eco-certification to Cariboo woodlot licensee Rod Blake, marking the emergence of BC into a rapidly expanding global market for certified wood products.
April 99

LIVING BETWEEN THE SEA AND THE SKY
The Gowgaia Institue is sponsoring a workshop with Arny and Amy Mindell, facilitators and Process Workers from Portland, Oregon. The workshop will be held on Saturday, October 23 and Sunday, October 24 in Skidegate. We are also offering a limited -edition print for sale in support of the workshop.

WHAT IF MACMILLAN BLOEDEL DISSAPPEARED FROM HAIDA GWAII ... AND WHAT WOULD THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?
For close to forty years TFL 39 has graced every forestry map of Haida Gwaii. And as long as it continues to do so, MacMillan Bloedel will be responsible for more forest, and more logging, than any other tenure-holder on the islands. But what if it didn't? What if MacMillan Bloedel were to pack up and go, taking it's machines, it's jobs, and everything else along with it. How would Haida Gwaii change? What would happen to our communities and our economy if the familiar red and white were no longer part of the island landscape.

SHOCKING EELS, PRETTYJOHN'S DOWRY AND OTHER STORIES
In the meadow there were 30 legs. Some crossed, others scissored, all tired. We were sprawled out near the sunny banks of the Upper Tlell, half way through a hike that led us here, to Prettyjohn's farm.
John Farrell, April98

HE SAID HE CUT DOWN THE GOLDEN SPRUCE
Grant Hadwin: the man with pride and a chain-saw. Was he a terrorist? Was he drowned or did he die from trying to live up to his promises in life. He said he cut down a tree without realizing it was Haida. He thought it was just a tree - a freak, but just a tree - or maybe a MacMillan Bloedel showcase property..
Ralph Nelson, April98

LRMP: ACRONYMS AND ALPHABITS

What is an LRMP?
Feb98

.LRMP: PART 2
More answers to questions... questions about the relationship between an LRMP table and government, who talks to who, and the role of the facilitator..
April98

A COMPANION FOR LONG ROAD TRIPS

More answers to questions... questions about the relationship between an LRMP table and government, who talks to who, and the role of the facilitator..
MC Davies, Feb 98

DIRT - THE ESCTATIC SKIN OF THE EARTH
I admit I bought this book because of the title. There sitting on the shelf in the bookstore was this slim pretty book with the word "Dirt" printed brightly in blood-red letters on its gold and blue cover. I tried out the sound of the word dirt rolling it around in my mouth a little. Starts off with the deep pulled-back-in-the-throat "d" - duh... sound. The "ir" winds up in through the back of the throat, rides along to the roof of the mouth, where the tip of the tongue clips a fast "t" against the back of the teeth.
MC Davies, September 98

WHY THE INTEREST-BASED MODEL IS NO SUITABLE FOR NEGOTIATIONS ABOUT ABORIGINAL RIGHTS
Negotiations concerning Aboriginal rights fail when the parties start with the assumption that the process is about measuring, purchasing and thereby extinguishing the special constitutional rights of Aboriginal people. It is argued in this [paper] that greater certainty and fairness can be achieved if the parties start with the idea that entrenched Aboriginal rights are here to stay, and that treaties are vehicles for understanding, respecting and accommodating those rights. Previous failures of the interest based approach will be reviewed...
Jack Woodward, September 98

OUR ELDERS AND CHIEFS SAID IF WE TELL THE TRUTH, THE TRUTH WILL PREVAIL
"I think our only option right now is court." Those are the words of Ron Brown Jr., president of the Council of the Haida Nation. The Council of the Haida Nation (CHN) is on the point of launching what stands to become a landmark case in Canadian legal history. What Brown and the CHN are proposing, and what some of the best and brightest lawyers practising aboriginal law today are nearly begging them to do, is to become the first natives to prove title to their traditional territories in court. If successful, it will be the crowning glory of close to thirty years of legal wrangling by dozens of First Nations, and it will forever alter the social and economic fabric of British Columbia, if not the entire nation.
Ian Lordon, September 98

COMMUNITY FOREST TALK MUST INCLUDE YOUTH VOICE
"Community Forest" is a concept that has been at the forefront of both public and private debate for the last few years. On-Island the concept was put into print by ICSI in the Consensus Document under the heading "Tenure Reform." Lately the concept has developed into an entity of its own. There are those who feel that the creation of a Community Forest would be a great step in providing local employment and ownership of the forest resource and there are those who see it as an opportunity to explore sustainable development for our communities outside the conventional forestry approaches of today. However, after the burst of euphoria over the initial concept subsides the logistics and practicality of a Community Forest become questionable. Where would we have our Community Forest? Are the Tree Farm Licences (TFLs) and Timber Supply Area (TSA) in the picture? What would you like to happen in your Community Forest? How do we want to log in our forest? Do we want to log in our forest? The big (multinational) companies want to be our "partners" in this venture but what exactly does that mean? Can we have TFLs, a TSA, a Community Forest and a future?.
Mark Ryzylo and Patty Daniels, September 98

SATELLITE VIEWS GIVE ME THE HAIDA GWAII BLUES
On August 29, 1963 a first generation Argon spy satellite inconspicuously orbited across the heavens watching the north coast. Its purpose was to address the developing Soviet Union's strategic missile capabilities. This perceived military threat was fueled by political and military leaders debating a supposed bomber gap, missile gap, and science gap. The political landscape of the era prompted the conception of a clandestine spy satellite program in the late 1950s. Military intelligence data from this program was declassified for "environmental studies" by President Bill Clinton in 1995..
Rob Wener, April98

THE GEOGRAPHY OF DEATH
Cartography has come along way, baby. Not the least since medieval maps depicted the extremities teeming with monsters and mythological wonders, dragons with two heads and serpents that eat their own tails..
John McCartney Farrell, Dec 98

MINISTRY HEARS BUT CANNOT LISTEN
"I'm the oldest man in Skidegate." Chief Gaathlaay lives in the Elders' Centre in Skidegate Heights. When he was born, in 1904, the idea of Skidegate Heights, even an Elders' Centre, would probably seem pretty farfetched to people living in the village at the time. But so would airplanes, radio, men on the moon, grapple-yarders, heck even Kool-Aid. Chief Gaathlaay has lived to witness the coming and going of many things. He was fishing for a living when Jean Chretien was still in diapers; he's older than Trudeau, and older than John F. Kennedy would be were he with us today..
Ian Lordon, Dec 98

HOUR ISLANDS, HOR WORLD, HOUR ECONOMY
Funny isn't it. How we talk about shopping local and yet can't wait to buy from Costco.How we fly the flag of Island self-governance one day and vote our allegiance to the regional district the next. How we champion the need for local investment at the same time our $50-million Gwaii Trust nest egg is parked in a bank offshore. I mean, really folks, isn't it time to put our money where our mouth is. Better still, why not print our own.
John McCartney Farrell, Dec 98

VOLUNTEERS DEFINE THE WORD DEDICATION
This was a year to remember... the coast-wide ban on fishing coho allowed for record numbers of salmon to return to the rivers and streams of Haida Gwaii. Fish managers say 1998 will be a benchmark from which to judge returns of coho in the future. And old timers will talk about the year you could walk across the creeks on their silvery backs..
John McCartney Farrell, Dec 98

BELDESSI HAS WORDS

Bill Beldessi has been connected with Moresby Island since 1954, when he lived at Moresby Camp with his parents. Bill's father was the woods manager for Alaska Pine. Bill Beldessi has only wanted to be one thing most of his life -- a logger. These two elements -- Moresby Island and logging have shaped his life. In the last few years Bill has tried his hand at shaping those elements himself. He is a director of the Sandspit Harbour Society, the Regional District director for Moresby Island, the Islands Community Stabilitiy Initiative (ICSI) representative for Moresby Island, and he is going to be the interim chair of the Standing Community Committee of the Regional Board (first elections were held Wednesday, July 1). I went to Bill's home in Sandspit and talked with him about his activities in the community.
Clemens Rettich, July 98

WHAT DO YOU DO WITH OLD REDNECKS?

RL Smith was the epitome of the polarized environmental debate of the 1980's. If you said 'save the trees' he said 'cut'em down.' If you said 'park' he said 'no fuggin way.' He was a friend and a champion to many, and a loud, prolific pain in the rear to a bunch more. It depended on what side of the fence you stood. And he didn't like fence-sitters. RL Smith printed approximately 100 issues of The Redneck News, and he wrote approximately 200,000 words in those issues. He wrote about the right to work, politicians, and "sissy environmentalists." In the early years RL hit the issues on the head, he did not pull punches, but in the in the later years more and more of the newsletter became community announcements. And then it stopped. So what happened to RL Smith?
Ian Lordon, July 98

FISHING DOWN THE FOOD WEB

Stock sustainability issues are not unique to the islands. A landmark study captured widespread media attention earlier this year with its unsettling depiction of declining global fishing stocks.
Ian Lordon, June 98

CLOSED LOOP

Monitoring the regulators who regulate the monitors who monitor the regulators. On Canada's East coast, the offshore oil industry is regulated by small boards composed of appointed provincial and federal representatives. In the case of Nova Scotia's offshore projects, the regulatory agency is called the Canada Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board, with five members who chair a number of committees responsible for regulating and monitoring the industry.
Ian Lordon, June 98

THE LAND AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN IS LIMITED

The Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP) is touted as being grassroots-local and the answer to controversy. It is neither. I have listened, and asked: "grass-roots" acquaintances disagree. They tell me the following represents their thoughts well enough.
Ian Lordon, May 98

THE CODE OF SURVIVAL
The great green thumb will soon slip from its glove and busy itself gardening under the spring sun. For those of you who are backyard stewards the rewards are plenty; be it the smell of tulips in May or a plate of potatoes come winter. Indeed backyard stewardship has been a measure of civilization. Planting a garden and cursing the slugs is like being part of a collective journey whose origins are as mysterious as human intelligence itself. Since the dawn of the Fertile Crescent, we have tamed and tormented any plant or animal that could serve as a crutch for survival while depending upon technology to ensure that the fruits of our labor could sustain us.
Nicholas Reynolds, May 98

SIMPLY STACKWOOD

I read this Reader's Digest article, "How to Build Out of Rock," and thought I could probably do this but it would take years. When I flipped over the page from the rock instructions, there was stackwall. I thought anyone can do this. At the time I felt I needed mending and I needed a home. I love renewing and making things from old -- taking chunks of wood that were abandoned and building a home with them felt wonderful. I've been overseas and I've seen people build out of whatever is available. I really think we have such abundance around us and we're sloppy -- we overuse. We all want the finest; lots of money to have everything, and there is waste all around us. I built these two buildings for seven thousand dollars and a year of labor. I didn't want to use more resources, which is what money is. I wanted to be able to build economically.
Erica Thompson and Mark Ruzylo, May 98

OUR ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT - REDUCING HUMAN IMPACT ON THE EARTH
The predominant understanding of the word "global" in my adult life has been formed by that famous picture of earth photographed during one of the early space voyages. Our planet appears to be a shining blue-green orb glowing gently against the great darkness of the universe, something so vast that we simply call it "space." That beautiful image exists in my mind's eye like some half-remembered dream, a vision floating at the edge of my consciousness - the sweetness of it, the mystery of it about to evaporate, fade out of sight in the morning mists.
MC Davies, May 98

A CRUDE ATTEMPT
Bill Belsey has done this a few times before. The vice-chair of the North Coast Oil and Gas Task Force is speaking to a handful of business people about the potential for a new kind of industry in the northwest. Today, it's at the Tlell River House and his audience is the QCI Chamber of Commerce. Earlier, it was the Old Massett Village Council office and the audience was the village council. Tomorrow - another day, another council...
Ian Lordon, May 98

THE POLITICS OF IDENTITY - WHAT SEPARATES ME FROM YOU?
When I was a kid, I got really freaked out at parades. I didn't even like Disneyland. I couldn't relate. I knew there were real people under those costumes and I couldn't see them. I felt separate and scared. I also felt envious because I wasn't having any fun.
Lisa Dunn, June 98

GOING MOBILE

I was born into a military family that travelled all the time; so my life has been really nomadic. When I first came up here I built a house on the back of my truck and later some cabins on the beach. Then I began a process of asking people if I could borrow their space for five or six months as a building site for a mobile home project. At the time it was a matter of getting a house up and believing that I could put it somewhere else sometime later. It seemed a bit of a backwards way of going about it, but it was also appealing. In the end we all need someplace to call home - a place to put energy that is tangible and good.
Mark Ruzylo and Erica Thompson, June 98

THE WHALES ARE OUT OF THE WATER

Biologist, Mary Morris was up on the Islands for a week this May to conduct Biophysical Surveys during the low tides - I was part of the boat and driver team for the project. On the third day we had just completed a survey of intertidal zones on Maude Island and needed to do a couple more. Mary suggested Bush Island in Alliford Bay. The island is a rock that almost disappears at high tide, but as we motored up it now had about 30 feet showing and was coated in a drapery of red and green seaweed. We had just tied off the boat and discussed the survey plot when we saw a pod of Orca about 100 metres away and to the north of us..
Bill Blount, June 98

GIVING THE LAND A VOICE - MAPPING OUR HOME PLACES

If you are interested in mapping then this is the book for you. A step-by-step approach is taken to walk you though the steps for mapping everything from your backyard to a greater bio-region.
May 97

AN INTERVIEW WITH GERRY BELLEFLEUR

How long have you lived in Sandspit? - We moved here January 9, 1981, 16 years-working on 17 years. What were the reasons for your move? - [I was] out of work down south, laid off about 3 months and was offered a job for 30 days for Thompson Logging, as a mechanic-for 30 days, and never left. Are the things you moved here for, still here? Do you continue to live here for the same reasons?
May 97

TO BE SITTING AT THIS TABLE

I have had a lot of thinking time lately. The reason being is that I have chosen to sit at the Local Resource Use Plan (LRUP) table for the Tlell Watershed. This table was formed late last year when the Ministry of Forests reacted to their obligations stated in the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU with ICSI). The obligation was to develop interim development plans through a participatory process for the Tlell and Government Creek Watersheds and to present these plans to ICSI or the Islands Forest Council (IFC) with in six months of the signing the agreement. After much soul searching and debating if my family-time could afford this sort of commitment I decided that I would sit at the table. So, once every two weeks I spend an entire day of my weekend or a long evening driving to some location for meetings. The drive gives me time to enjoy the beach line scenery, visit with those I carpool with....and think.
Patty Daniels, May 97

FRIENDS OF JIINANGA VIDEO IS "BEST OF"

Knowledge Network is including the Friends of Jiinanga video in their "The Best of Hometown Video." The "Friends of Jiinanga" video footage taken by Rob Wener of Queen Charlotte will be a part of 2 half-hour programs that will be shown in early September. .
May 97

HABITAT IS FOR THE BIRDS

If you have ever driven down a logging road, past the last fork, past the last cut block, up the last skid road, and onto the last landing, you have probably encountered a wall of trees. This is the end of the road. .
Rob Wener, May 97

AN INTERVIEW WITH DAVE PUTTERILL

How long have you lived in Sandspit? - We've lived here 22 years, We lived in Thurston Harbour originally, the Frank Beban Logging camp there. 1973 in Sandspit originally. Its quite a few years. What were your reasons for the move? - The reason for staying on the islands basically, was just the sheer wildness of it all. We were living in Port Alberni and Frank Beban phoned us up and offered us a job in a logging camp, on the Queen Charlotte Islands. He was interested in a teacher. A friend of ours, who was working for Frank, recommended Audrey (Dave's spouse), and the next thing you know we're up on the Charlottes.
May 97

"REASON" MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND

I went to New Brunswick. It snowed through the dawn. I arrived tired of sitting on the bus. I wanted to walk in the Eastern forests. I wanted to commune there with trees. I wanted a place to stay awhile. I could only find saplings and tended plantations. I asked where the old growth forest was-I asked many, and I was told by many. I saw all the miles of road across the province before I really believed," There isn't any." .
Ralph Nelson, May 97

WEAVING SPIRIT, SPRUCE AND CEDAR
Weaving cedar means the same thing today as it did in our previous lives except I am not weaving clothing for my children. It is about my responsibility of harvesting spruce roots, cedar bark and other plants associate to the art of basketry. Each of these trees has a spirit. Each of us has a spirit. The trees, the blades of grass, the rocks, mankind and all things of this earth have a spirit. No spirit is greater or more valuable than the other. All of us fit together, we are all part of each other and we all depend on each other. The bark, the roots, the flesh on the fish is not our right. Each of these things that are given to us are the gifts from living spirits. Anyone who has gone harvesting for bark has experienced speaking to and felling the spirit of the tree. It is not a made up fairy tale thing. It is a real thing. We speak to the tree and it speaks to us. Harvesting is a responsibility to all things. It is an annual event that reminds us that we have a responsibility to all things. It is an annual reminder that I am only a small part of a big thing that is happening.
S Davies, November 97

BEING DRAWN INTO THE FAMILIAR

It is every outdoor educator's dream: all participants, wearing proper hiking gear, arriving on time and willing to take direction from those who know the terrain. You might expect punctuality from a group of mountaineers, but not from twenty-four artists, who according to a popular stereotype are poor candidates for any formal group activity. But shortly after 8 am the first load is ready to board the Kingii. Terry Husband, its owner, tells me that the name of his boat means 'always looking down into the sea.'
Astrid Greene, November 97

FOREST REPORT RECOMMENDS (TREE STANDING) CHANGES

SpruceRoots - Joy, when did you arrive here on the Islands. Would you give me a little background about yourself?
Joy - I came here approximately 30 years ago. I lived and taught school here. I was here for five years, in Sandspit and Queen Charlotte, and then moved away. When I was away I went into real estate for about 17 years, then bought an old shack here in Sandspit and started renovating. I always wanted to come back to the Islands. I spent a year in wonderful retirement, I worked at whatever project I wanted and it was great, I loved it. Then I met Ken and decided to take up the challenge of saw- milling.
'S Davies, September 97

I LOVE TO WORK, I LOVE THE BUSINESS, I LOVE THE CHALLENGE

It is every outdoor educator's dream: all participants, wearing proper hiking gear, arriving on time and willing to take direction from those who know the terrain. You might expect punctuality from a group of mountaineers, but not from twenty-four artists, who according to a popular stereotype are poor candidates for any formal group activity. But shortly after 8 am the first load is ready to board the Kingii. Terry Husband, its owner, tells me that the name of his boat means 'always looking down into the sea.'
S Davies, September 97

FRANK TALK: DALE LORE SHARES HIS OPINIONS

SpruceRoots - Are ICSI's goals supported by the local Ministry of Forests office?
Dale Lore - Yes, and I have good reason to believe that. I have talked to people and I have connections in Victoria. I have feedback telling me that Krishka is exceeding Brash - the previous District Manager - in support of us. I am told that she is the strongest advocate that they have ever seen for local control.'
S Davies, October 97

TWO WOMEN IN BUSINESS
We have a sense of being active participants i nour own future, and we have seen that we're all in this together. Interviews with Carol Bowler and Rebbecca Levirs
October 97

VOLUME OR AREA - THAT IS THE QUESTION - OR IS IT?

There are two kinds of forest license in this province: volume-based and area-based. Volume-based is a license to log a given volume of timber from a Timber Supply Area, managed by the province. Area-based is a license to manage a specific area of forest - a Tree Farm License or woodlot - over the long term.
Leslie Johnson, October 97

LOCAL BOAT DESIGN IS FAST!
Students from the Living and Learning School launched a rowing boat of their own design and making June 11,1997 at Skidegate beach. The boat with its 3 sets of oars was rowed out into Skidegate Channel at a great clip; up and down in front of the village, and then back into shore for another load of eager passengers. Parents and other students watched and took photos from the beach.
June 97

DRAIN THE LAKE AND DAM THE CONSEQUENCES
As I wait patiently for the Queen Charlotte Power Corporation to complete there studies and reports, and for them to conduct a public review process of their intentions at Takakia Lake, I thought it would be interesting for people to know how the lake was named.
June 97

NO GUTS, NO GLORY - A PERSONAL EXPLORATION OF FEAR AND COURAGE
Who am I to write this article about courage? What can I offer that is new or worthwhile? Why should I bother? Those kinds of self-limiting questions are the same familiar ones that can stop any of us from doing scary things. Whenever we dare to speak out, or to stand out, we are rising above our fears and our self-defeating self-talk. We are being courageous..
June 97

TAKAKIA LAKE - THERE IS A PLACE OF EXTRAORDINARY BEAUTY
A notice of application for "water license water act" appearing in the Queen Charlotte Islands Observer, February 13th placed by the Queen Charlotte Power Corporation is of deep concern for a number of residents who over the years have investigated trying to protect Takakai Lake. This alpine lake set in the San Cristoval mountains of southern Moresby has a spectacular waterfall that drops about 1100 feet. .
February 97

WATER, WATER, EVERYWHERE - THE TLELL EXAMPLE
Ecosystem-based planning starts with a single key idea­p;living sustainably in a forest means living within the ecologicallimits of the forest. These limits mean that we need to leave the forest composition, structure, and function intact. We must do this from the large watersheds down to the single stands of forest, and then further down to the microscopic level. We must do this at all scales, from millennia down to centuries, down to days and even hours.
February 97

THE BEST LAID PLANS
Managing the land has become more complex over the last decade. There is increasing demand for areas to be set aside for the future, there has been the constant demand from logging companies to keep their annual allowable cut up, and local communities are seeing the trees shipped to the lower mainland for processing - everyone is concerned over the uncertainty of what the future may bring or not bring. .
S Davies, January 97

TAKING IT ALL AWAY - COMMUNITIES SAY ENOUGH IS ENOUGH
In November 1994, BC's Ministry of Forests released a "socio-economic analysis" of the Queen Charlotte Timber Supply Area on Haida Gwaii. The report followed publication of a Timber Supply Review which came to the sobering conclusion that current logging rates in the Timber Supply Area are more than double the long-term "sustainable" level. The socio-economic analysis, prepared by the Ministry's Economics and Trade Branch, provides readers with several important statistics on forest industry activity on Haida Gwaii. Among the most telling facts presented is that 94 percent of all the trees logged on the Islands are barged to the Lower Mainland or Vancouver Island for processing. This confirms what Islanders have long known: far too many of the jobs and other social and economic benefits derived from the two million cubic metres of timber logged every year go to non-Island residents. Faced with a certain and substantial drop in future logging rates, many Haida Gwaii residents have come to the conclusion that it's time the forest industry in their region was restructured.
.March 96

WATERFALL CREEK AND OUR FAMILY
I was born March 4, 1967 at the Queen Charlotte General Hospital. My father moved to Haida Gwaii from West Germany in 1961 and has been working for MacMillan Bloedel since April 2, 1962. My mother is Haida of the Yak'u'laanaas, Masset Inlet Middle Town people whom are the descendants of Foam Woman, we originate from a reef at Bolkus Island, Gwaii Haanas and as Haida have occupied all of Haida Gwaii and southern Alaska.
Ralph Stocker, February 96

THE ICSI CONSENSUS
The Island Community Stability Initiative (ICSI) was formed in November 1995 by elected representatives, and their designated alternates, from every community and rural electoral area on the archipelago known as Haida Gwaii and as the Queen Charlotte Islands. Through a series of advertised public meetings ICSI has sought and received broad public support. In this document, the place is referred to as "the Islands;" and our collection of towns, villages and rural settlements is referred to as "the Island Community. This living document represents our best efforts to achieve consensus and does not include specific management prescriptions which will be addressed by a community resource board.
January 96

YAKOUN LAKE JOURNAL - THE WEEKEND WALK
Saturday, light cloud, some sun, perfect weather found a dozen people with gear and five canoes-kayaks on the beach at Ethelene Bay where Ethelene Creek runs into the lake and the Yakoun River begins. Also here six trails converge in a 50-metre radius. One couple enjoyed the Ethelene Beach area so they stayed. Three boats set out with 5 aboard for the Straight Point-Wasco Point narrows. Others followed the ribboned and renewed meandering Haida lower trail to Wasco Point with a first view of the expansive open lake and wilderness basin. Walkers in groups spread out along the low water shoreline to Baddeck delta and beach. The canoes rounded the point, had a rest and then with a light breeze paddled on. The reeds and grasses of Baddeck flats and Eagle Island outlined the triangular rock cliff now to be seen on Cabin Beach peninsula.
August 96

HOW MANY CANOES ARE ON THAT BLACK SHIP?
On August 1 the Haida Brave was refused passage through a body of water known as Auu or Masset Inlet. This is the story as witnessed by Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas who was out on the water when the black ship came. "Datlamen Creek, loaded," a voice crows from a lumbering truck as it leaves the valley behind. Crackling radio codes herald the fall of heaven's pillars. "5 k empty." In hungry anticipation convoys of trucks crawl into the rainforests. I can hear the battle as they overtake those distant valleys. I know the scent of wood, dragged from their living halls. The swarm of man ... gathering thousands of thousands of fallen trees.
August 96

FISHING, FAMILY AND LIVELIHOOD
A SpruceRoots interview with Glen and Linda Davies. Linda and Glen Davies talk about family, community and fishing for a livelihood on Haida Gwaii
July 96

CUTTING WOOD, TRANSFORMING WOOD... MAKING A LIVELIHOOD
Charles and Anne Gee live in Masset. They produce bent wood boxes, art magnets, and other small handmade wood products from red alder. Charles started out in the box business with Kun Kyungaas (Agnes Adams) of Old Massett, together they formed the Old Massett Box Works. Agnes died in 1994. Since that time Charles has remarried and is continuing to pursue the original idea of producing carefully made products from local wood. Charles and Anne practice a simple way of making a living­p;they take a small volume of alder wood, mill it into planks, dry it, and produce fine decorated products for sale.
June 96

AND THE SIGN SAID... THOUGHTS ON NATURE AND WRITING
Living on Haida Gwaii has heightened my sense of irony. Whenever my friends from other parts of the world come for a visit, I often find myself using logging roads for outdoor recreational pursuits. These very roads have been put in to allow logging companies easy access to areas for cutting -and that still means - clearcutting timber.
June 96

TIMBERWEST SANDSPIT - A PERSPECTIVE ON COMMUNITY STABILITY
(
Submitted by TimberWest.) TimberWest Forest Limited began its history on the Queen Charlotte Islands (QCI) back in 1922 when Pacific Mills, owner of the Ocean Falls pulp mill, purchased several timber rights and private land on Graham and Moresby Islands. Timber harvesting began in the late 1930's when the company moved a float camp into the area. During the 70's and 80's, a series of major tenure amendments took place and the company's Crown Grant lots, Pulp Licences and Timber Licences were restructured to create TimberWest's current tenure portfolio of Tree Farm Licence, Forest Licence and several Timber Licences.
June 96